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Old Try

District Twelve.




Henry River Mill made yarn. Fine North Carolina yarn. Made that fine North Carolina yarn for sixty years until it didn't any more. The mill closed. The people moved. The village stayed.

She stayed there, not complete, not destroyed, just waiting for something. Maybe that something was Wade Shepard, the 83 year-old who bought the whole damn town. Maybe that something was a casting scout working on...

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History In Color.



In case you can't tell, I'm a big history buff. Not in the 'I can recite history at the drop of a hat' kind of way but in the 'Can you believe how amazing this fact is? Dusted off and nearly forgotten but just as alive as the day she was born!' kind of way.



So, imagine how excited I was to find History in Color.A site that would be no less fascinating if I didn't learn that the guy who makes these,...

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Barnstorm.


Back in January, I met up with some Nashville fellas for a beer while we were in town. Marianna was wiped from our epic Southern Roadtrip (in which we averaged 250 miles a day over ten days, even though we only drove every second day, thus 500 a leg) so I had to go it alone. But that's one of the things I like doing: meeting up with folks who find our stuff and appreciate it.

Mr. Hartline is one of...

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Hog wild.



Not sure what I was doing when I came across this gem, but I'm sure glad I was wandering around the internet aimlessly at the right time.

Nicknames of the states. As told by hogs of course, courtesy of H.W. Hill & Co. out of Decatur Illinois.

Just beautiful.





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Imported from Sweden.



No idea how these beauts from Jönköping, Sweden made it into our match drawer. But they did. And I had to share them because the box is beautiful. Then, of course, I get tied up reading about em. 

The short of it: these matches were patented in 1927 by Ivan Kruger, the Match King of Sweden, though they claim to've been around for one hundred twenty years. They ship all over the world and end up in...

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